Our Gallery

Take a trip through our gallery right through this page. From the blown glass of owner Bob Meyer to paintings by award-winning local watercolorists, we have a lot of beautiful and high quality work. Take a look!



Lighting

Bob has developed a line of Light Shades that are available in multiple sizes, shapes, colors, and even how much light they let through. These Shades can be used with pendant fixtures, chandeliers, table lamps, sconces, and even floor lamps. Take a look at how light truly brings blown glass to life.

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Floats

We offer a great variety of hand-blown glass floats.  They're as popular as ever here along the Pacific coast, where the Japanese fishing floats still occasionally wash up on our beaches - and we have colors to use in them that the original float-makers couldn't have dreamed of!

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Memorial Glass

The Memorial Orb is a solid sphere of glass in which cremains have been permanently incorporated into the glass.  It requires only a small amount of ash, so is a great way to allow multiple family members to remain close to a loved one.      

Bob has been creating Memorial Orbs since shortly after starting his studio in 2005. He creates the Orbs right in our glassblowing studio, and the ashes are handled meticulously throughout the process.  

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Bob's Other Blown Glass

Although the Shades, Floats and Orbs have their own sections here, they're by no means all that Bob creates.  Here you'll get a chance to see some of Bob's other work, and it really is quite a variety.

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Blown Glass

The term Blown Glass is used for things created with the technique known as "off-hand" or "free-blown" glassblowing, which implies that the blowing and shaping is done without the use of molds - relying only on the skill of the glassblower to shape the piece. 

The glass used is often referred to as "soft glass", a soda-lime glass with a relatively "low" melting point, with which the entire piece will remain flexible to some degree while being created.

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Lampwork

Lampworking uses similar techniques to to off-hand glassblowing, but involves the use of an extremely hot torch and usually a glass with a higher melting point, borosilicate glass.   Unlike off-hand glassblowing, the glass is used in rod or tube form, and melted only as needed to create desired shapes and effects.  Also unlike "soft glass", borosilicate stiffens very shortly after being heated, so much of a piece is stiff while being worked on.

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Fused Glass

Glass Fusing is the process of shaping or joining two or more pieces of glass by heating them in a kiln. Various outcomes can be achieved by taking the glass up to different temperatures.

Slumping a flat piece of glass will soften it just enough to take on the curve of a mold, but not enough for it to attach to a second piece of glass. Slumping requires a top temperature of 1250-1300 degrees F.

Tack Fusing will join a couple pieces, but not soften them enough to round the edge of each piece. This is achieved by heating the glass to1300-1350 degrees.

Full Fusing takes the glass to a fully molten state, resulting not only in attached pieces, but also a nice, smooth surface. This requires heating to 1400-1500 degrees.

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Stained Glass

Stained Glass refers to both colored glass as a material, and to the works created from it.  Typically, colored glass in sheet form is cut into small pieces and arranged to form patterns or pictures, held together (traditionally) by strips of lead, and supported by a rigid frame.  As a result, creating stained glass work requires not only the artistic skill to conceive an appropriate and workable design, but also the engineering skills to assemble the piece.  A stained glass work must at least support its own weight, but, depending on the intended use (e.g., as a window), must also be able to withstand forces like wind and rain.  


Earlier in its thousand-year history, the term applied almost exclusively to the windows of churches and other significant religious buildings.  The creations of modern stained glass artists have expanded to include three-dimensional structures and sculpture.

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