LIGHTING

We're currently not offering our shades for sale online. By it's nature, each piece of blown glass is unique, and unique to varying degrees. On top of that, the availability of various colors has been inconsistent since the Covid episode in 2020. Though some of the initial supply chain issues are largerly resolved, there are now perennial shortages of various raw materials, and it seems that the colors I've relied on for years are inordinately affected.

I am still making the shades, but in slightly - and continually - varying color combinations. The situation does not lend itself well to online sales. The photographer and "web master" are both me (Bob), and the time requirement for maintaining unique products on a website are prohibitive.


photo: "Drift Inn" shades on chandelier

Fluted Shades are of our "standard" size, approximately 6-8" tall and 6-8" wide at the widest point. They work well with pendant fixtures, chandeliers, sconce lights, and many table lamps.

The Color Wrap is a unique style of color application. After applying a solid layer of opaque color, multiple colors on a separate piece of molten glass are simultaneously "wrapped" around that main piece before being encased with a second layer of clear glass and blown.


photo: "Steel Blue v2.0" shades on chandelier

Fluted Shades are of our "standard" size, approximately 6-8" tall and 6-8" wide at the widest point. They work well with pendant fixtures, chandeliers, sconce lights, and many table lamps.

The Swirled color is a method of application in which the color is applied directely to the piece and moved ("swirled") around before it's encased in a second layer of clear glass and blown. Since there's no substantial background color used, there's a good deal of transparency - great for use with antique-style light bulbs.


photo: "Lava" straight-side shades on pendants

Our straight-sided and flat-edged Shades are another of our "standard" size, able to work with Pendants, Chandeliers, Sconces, and many Table Lamps.

The Color Wrap is a unique style of color application. After applying a solid layer of opaque color, multiple colors on a separate piece of molten glass are simultaneously "wrapped" around that main piece before being encased with a second layer of clear glass and blown.


photo: Chandelier with bland stock shades

There are a number of methods that have been used over the years to attach light/lamp shades to the hardware that actually provides the light. For at least the past decade, the method that has become pretty much universal is the "medium base (1.5" outer diameter) socket" that's threaded on the outside, accompanied by a threaded ring that screws on to secure the shade.